To relocate or not to relocate: Seven questions to ask your employer before moving

You love your job, but would you move across the country for it? If your employer has locations around the country or globe, the day may come when they ask you to relocate.

Knowing what questions to ask your employer before relocating can help you decide whether to accept their offer or stay home-sweet-home.

1) Will the company pay for my move?

Some organizations provide employees with a moving package that includes furniture and vehicle shipping. Your company should also help you pay for a realtor and cover any temporary housing expenses. Different packages will have various amenities, such as flights or even food while you’re on the road. 

Trethowans
Trethowans

Employees often forget about the cost of moving their vehicles. If your employer doesn’t have a clause to pay for a car shipping company, it’s time to renegotiate your relocation package.

Hiring an enclosed car shipping company like Guardian Auto Transport reduces your stress and ensures you can hit the ground running in your new location. Your company is asking you to uproot your whole life, so asking your employer to provide safe, reliable transport for your vehicle is well within reason.  

2) Does the new position offer promotions or advancements?

Moving to a new location is a huge commitment. You don’t want to travel to a whole new city just to do the same job you’ve always done. One of the most important questions to ask your employer before relocating is how the new position will help you advance in the company. You should also research industries in the target area if you ever want to change employers.

3) What is the cost of living in the new location?

Not all communities have the same cost of living. For example, if you move from the Midwest to a large coastal city, your salary might not stretch as far on the beach as it did on the farm. Before you commit to relocating, ask your employer about the cost of living and if your salary will adjust accordingly.

4) What will the commute be like?

You don’t want to move just to realize you’re now stuck with a two-hour daily commute. Your employer might be able to suggest neighborhoods in the area with a more reasonable commute. Barring that, consider declining the request to relocate. Long commutes may not sound like a dealbreaker at first, but remember that the time you spend commuting is time you could spend enjoying your life. 

5) Can I talk to someone at that location?

Before you commit to relocating, you’ll want to know about the company culture at your new location. The best way to do this is by talking with employees who already work there. If possible, visit the site and tour with an employee who works in a similar position to yours.

Ask the employee about their daily tasks, the commute, company culture, and other relative issues you might encounter. For example, how is the management? Is reasonable time given for deadlines?  Pay attention to how the employees interact and watch out for stressed or tired body language.

6) How soon do you need an answer? 

The final question to ask your employer before relocating is how much time you have to think about it. If your employer requests an immediate answer, consider that a red flag. A considerate employee will understand that this is a big decision requiring research and conversations with your family.

7) When do I start?

Similar to asking how soon your boss needs an answer, you should ask for a clear idea of the expected timetable. Knowing when your first day at a new company is will give you the framing you need to get your calendar in order. Be sure to budget yourself time to settle in after the move so that you bring your best self to your first day. 

Make sure you ask the right questions before committing to a move

When your employer offers the opportunity to relocate, you should ask questions about the process and expenses. Hopefully, your employer gives you a moving package that includes paying to relocate your furniture and vehicle. If all goes well, you’ll be breaking out the bubble wrap on Grandma’s china soon.